Saturday, November 16, 2013

The Bicycle Thief (Revised)

The Bicycle Thief is a film that takes place in post-war Italy about a man, Antonio, who's bicycle is stolen.  He must find it in order to keep his job putting posters up throughout the city.  His friends and son help him track down the bicycle thief, which they fail to do, and at one point he is so desperate that he steals someone else's bike.

There aren't many movies like the Bicycle Thief today; most modern movies have more of a complex plot line and surprising twists.  This movie reflects the Italian Neorealism movement that took place in Italy, post-World War II, when films showed people of lower or working class, filmed on location, and often using non-professional actors.  Italian Neorealist films displayed the hard times economically in Italy during this time, and the general despondency that was felt by the people.

The Bicycle Thief communicates the desperation during that time through Antonio's need for his lost bike.  People act rashly and impulsively when trying to get what they want.  Antonio gets almost violent with people when accusing them of stealing his bike, and when he is caught stealing someone else's bike people are coercive and and brash, rather than acting democratically.  We also see the economic and moral struggle that was present during post-war Italy, at the very beginning when there are crowds of people yelling and pushing in order to be considered for a job offering.  And throughout the whole film, we see people desperate for money and food, stealing, yelling, and starving in the streets.  It all seems so glum and hopeless and peoples morals start to crumble with their hope.  People act unjustly and rude towards each other and it's all because of the general poverty, oppression, and desperation.

Neo-realist films typically were filmed very plainly, with long takes and little to no effects.  This represented the gloom and despair that was felt in this time, and The Bicycle Thief is no exception to this rule.

Friday, November 15, 2013

The Bicycle Thief

The Bicycle Thief is a film that takes play in post-war Italy about a man, Antonio, who's bicycle is stolen and must get it back in order to keep his job, involving putting posters up throughout the city.  His friends and son help him track down the bicycle thief, which they fail to do, and at one point he is so desperate for a bike that he steals someone else's and is caught.

The film is in black and white and is in Italian with English subtitles.  There aren't many movies like this today; most modern movies have more of a complex plot line and surprising twists.  This movie reflects the Italian Neorealism movement that took place in Italy, post-World War II, when films involved people of lower or working class, filmed on location, and often using non-professional actors.  Italian Neorealist films displayed the hard times economically in Italy during this time, and the general desperation that was felt by the people.

The Bicycle Thief communicates the desperation during that time through Antonio's need for his lost bike.  People act rashly and impulsively (including himself) when accusing people of things.  He gets almost violent with people when accusing them of stealing his bike, and at one point when he is caught stealing someone else's bike, people act violently and chaotic, rather than democratically.  We also see the economic and moral struggle that was present during post-war Italy, at the very beginning when there are crowds of people yelling and pushing in order to be offered a job by the man assigning jobs.  And throughout the whole film, we see people desperate for money and food, stealing, yelling, and starving in the streets.  It all seems so glum and hopeless and peoples morals start to crumble with their hope.  People act unjustly and rude towards each other and it's all because of the general poverty, oppression, and desperation.